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New Artist Member: Federica Foglia

Posted January 28th, 2022 in Announcements, New Acquisitions, New Digital Files, News / Events

Canyon Cinema is pleased to welcome the transnational visual artist and writer Federica Foglia to the collection!

Federica Foglia is interested in issues of migration, citizenship and identity, displacement, women of the diaspora, migrant temporalities, and finding a visual language to investigate these experiences. Her practice revolves around recycled cinema, amateur filmmaking, imaginary archives.

Foglia holds a BA in Multimedia Languages and Digital Computing for Humanities: History of Art, Theatre, and Cinema from the University of Naples L’Orientale, an MFA in Film from York University, Toronto and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Cinema and Media Arts at York University (Toronto).

Her works have been exhibited and won awards in several art galleries and film festivals, including Images Festival, Alchemy Film & Moving Image Festival, Anthology Film Archives, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Alicante MACA, BIDEODROMO, BilbaoArte Foundation, Toronto International Film Festival, Antimatter [Media Art], Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, Human Rights Watch Film Festival, Mostra Internazionale del Cinema di Genova, Vancouver International Film Festival, Reykjavík International Film Festival, Visions in the Nunnery – Whitechapel UK, Groupe Intervention Vidéo Montreal, SCAD Savannah International Film Festival, ULTRAcinema Festival Mexico, Muestra de Video Arte Faenza, MIMESIS Documentary Festival, Camerimage.

Now available to rent from Canyon Cinema:

Currents / Perpendicolare Avanti (Federica Foglia, 2021, 18 minutes, color, sound, digital file)

Currents / Perpendicolare Avanti is a camera-less, hand-made, 16mm film collage, based on the artist’s autobiographical experience as an immigrant. The film explores the dynamics of inhabiting the in-between space of multiple countries and temporalities through visual and sound abstraction, interlacing and recycling pre-existing film materials and fragments of otherwise anonymous orphan films. Utilizing these so-called “scraps,” Currents is a film of extensive remediation, treated by hand through the use of the emulsion lifting technique, thereby re-imagining, re-constructing, and de-constructing the liminality of immigrant life.